Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Constantinople, First Afternoon

Thursday, March 11, 1651
With clear skies and cool temperatures, a gentle breeze and a prevailing wind blowing south along the Black Sea's west coast.

It will take ten days for the party to travel the 380 nautical miles to Constantinople. As you make your way north, you find the cool temperatures worsening somewhat, as the nights steadily become more brisk and the days more cool. There's only a little rain over your journey, however; some the night after leaving Koufonisia, some off the coast of Lesbos and a good, moderate rain the afternoon you make your way through the strait at Canakkale.

The journey is fairly uninteresting. The crew seem in better spirits for some resting time in Koufonisia, which had proven to be more relaxing than their last sojourn in Fiume. The Captain seems in better spirits too, which improve still further after stopping in the small town of Eresos on Lesbos to pick up a pilot who knows the waters of the Straits and of the Black Sea. The pilot's name is Meredith, a 45-year old Turkish woman with hard, experienced eyes, a silent temperment and considerable strength, standing 6 foot one and weighing some 17 stone. She takes over the wheel with little ceremony, and apparently without spite from the previous pilot, Gerhund, who had apparently gone to pieces after the near sinking at Koufonisia.

The Dardanelles strait is quite narrow, no wider than a medium sized river (narrower than the Weser that the party crossed the day after burying the Captain's husband), but the Sea of Marmara on the other side is wide, smooth and easy sailing. The Dardanelles and the sea beyond are filled with boats, the strait being something of a friendly experience as you hail the crews of ships moving just fifteen feet off the beam, even where a bit of supply is passed back and forth between crews. Marmara has hundreds of little boats skittering this way and that, some coming quite close to be run over by the Petrel ... but it all seems to be quite normal, as no one shows the slightest bit of alarm. Meredith breaks her silence to tell the crew to settle down, that if one of these crazy small boat pilots is struck she'll work that day for free.

Constantinople is magnificent. The party comes ashore there with eyes open. They have been to Venice, and to Hamburg, so they have seen big ports before, but there's something truly elegant and Old World about Constantinople that those European cities lacked. Where Venice had a few beautiful piazzas, Constantinople seems to stretch for miles with nothing but. The huge Blue Mosque and the Great Santa Sofia rise like a mother and father from the city, seeming to embrace the teeming, odorous, shouting, passionate marketeers, peddlers, musicians, city officials and holy men that dominate the narrow city streets, the wide boulevards, the preponderous waterfront that stretches all around the point called the "Golden Horn" ... and gold indeed seems plentiful enough to sink all the hundred, perhaps two hundred ships in the harbor.

The market for Constantinople can be found here.

A map of old Constantinople:

70 comments:

Kismet Korkmaz said...

Random note as I finish my pass on the items...

In weaver could you double check the weight on the basket, woven thatch? 2 cubic feet capacity but 124.5 lbs? Perhaps I am not thinking of the same kind of basket?

Lukas said...

Also I would like to look into some books on construction, local laws and local culture.

There appear to be common and uncommon books available but not rare.

Meanwhile I have to go double check the value of the gem and owl as it looks like I actually have to get rid of those for cash now...

Lukas said...

Oh, and I'm curious how long a 1st college portrait of myself would take.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Yes, that's clearly wrong on the basket.

12 oz. And the 0 price is still 1 c.p. Darn that glitch.

Assume the books are 'common' unless you want something very unusual.

For the absence of rare books,
Constantinople has lost its primacy as a center of learning since the rise of Islam; so that's reflected in the availability of books.

About two hours for your portrait.

Maximillian Boii said...

To clarify regarding the new lapidary shop, You implied that they will not buy stones of a size or variety not listed, correct?

Alexis Smolensk said...

The variety is fixed; we can make a deal on a different size.

Maximillian Boii said...

OK inventory updated to account for the travel.
Next up replenishing stores:

I direct Mareo to have his horse reshod, and to purchase 40 lbs of horse feed, and 400 lbs of hay to be delivered to the ship.

Meanwhile, I purchase 15 lbs of beef jerky (all 60 sticks), a sack of wheat flour, a flask of cooking oil, a box of paprika, a box of black pepper, and a box of salt.

Ahmet said...

Ahmet also replenishes his provisions and those for the horses. And the goat and the chickens.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Does the table look more full?

Lukas said...

Sounds good.

I will buy 3 books on each of the topics...
3 on construction (books applicable to missions and keeps would be best)
3 on law (Preferrably anything relevant to establishing missions or other organizations not associated with current existing organizations in the area.)
3 on local culture (generally anything interesting and 'exotic')

I will get a portrait done.

I also will go shopping and bring Hichem with me if he would like and try and pick up a thing or two he might be interested in.

I will also goad my companions into exploring a bit more with me. We're in Constantinople and you're only getting chicken food!

I will also be getting other things, but won't list them out unless you'd like me to.

Lukas said...

Oh and Alexis, it is at a magnitude where it's hard to say big without any more emphasis.

That said, I noticed some things I didn't see before and very much liked to see them.

I like getting little odds and ends that show up as I go.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Hichem would like to pick up a walking cane. He finds his hip wears on him when he walks any great distance, and he understands he's going to be climbing up into the center of Anatolia.

Maximillian Boii said...

It does look more full!

(Sorry about doing this in multiple posts; I don't like to take too long on a single post. If you prefer we just update our sheets and ask questions where necessary, please let me know.)

Mareo has a weak heart, so I take him to find an herbalist, and purchase for him a box of woundwort. while there, I pepper the apothecary with questions about how to properly use it, where it grows, and identifying characteristics, etc.

I also purchase a pot of Herbal Euphoric, asking for more info about its effects and use. Do you eat it?

Other miscellaneous items I purchase:
a wood axe,
an agate figurine
a shave
a bath
a laundering
(I'm going to go ahead and say Mareo gets those last three too.)

OK, now that all that housekeeping stuff is taken care of, I'm up for exploring Lukas. Lead the way!

Ahmet said...

Only one healing salve? Bummer.

Ahmet joins the explorers.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Please feel free to just ask questions about anything that needs clarifying. You don't need to tell me what you buy; however, other players may appreciate that information.

The woundwort is dried, and should be crushed into cold water. So long as Mareo takes 3 oz. on the day he happens to drop below -5 hp, he gets a +4 on his saving throw against death.

The euphoric will make time pass more quickly, and will improve morale +2 while modifying to hit and damage by -1 each. It also provides general contentment. Note that many NPCs would be adverse to taking it.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Sofia, though the party may leave Constantinople before you're able to join them again, please feel free to buy in the city when you're able to do so.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Incidentally, Mareo's weak heart is quite rare. The chances of getting it is something like one in two to three thousand.

Lukas said...

I will not only get him a walking stick, I will do my best to find him a carved one. Probably with animal or something exotic carved on the handle.

I would also like to make that the first stop since I intend to do some walking in Constantinople.

Being the most prominent locations, I would like to visit the Blue Mosque, checking out any shops or vendors along the way.

Maximillian Boii said...

Alexis, I was confusing again and used incorrect terminology. The sheet's actual wording is "low cardiovascular strength." and effects ability to hold breath and endurance at altitude. I was intending for him to use it if we go mountain climbing.

Lukas said...

I lead us, or rather find the way to, the Blue Mosque after buying Hichem a fancy walking stick (As long as it retains function of coarse).

Alexis Smolensk said...

Sorry, Maximillian. I do need specific phrases in these instances.

Presume, then, that a 3 oz. dose will be good to keep Mareo in fit condition for six hours (no penalties at all, like any other individual), and that the woundwart will be effective once per day.

Alexis Smolensk said...

The next post is up.

Andrej said...

Putting this here, after the posts have moved on, for lack of a better spot. I'm assuming Andrej is out shopping while the est of the party is dealing with the etheral wolf:

Andrej sells his bit of polished coral and purchases:

a pocket telescope
a 10 oz. bottle of whiskey
a trained adult monkey
a silver holy symbol
a quality camelhair yalma
a fez
1 healing salve

I assume we'll get together and figure out what to do about hay before leaving Constantinople.

Andrej also paid up his freight costs through Constantinople.

Alexis Smolensk said...

This is the right place for this comment.

Yes, Andrej has no idea what his brethren are up to.

He buys, sells, wanders the city, sees many sights and things, and is astounded at the Oriental aspect of the city - the apparent loose morals, the indifference to apparent aggression, the odd garb of the women who are yet highly respected by all ... even though Andrej has known many Moslems, seeing them in a place like this is strange indeed.

Andrej said...

Andrej will take the day to see such sites. Should he happen upon a small group or a lone half-orc he attempts to make their acquaintance if possible and ask for news of the homeland, should they have any.

His armor has been left upon the ship and he dons the yalma and the fez rather than his typical cassock once they are purchased, packing the latter away with his things. His new silver cross and Aksion Spacimo are also each stuck prominently into his belt. He may want to blend in some and begins, perhaps, to see and smell a bit of home... but he is not denying what he now is.

Intoxicated perhaps with the city, the evening will be spent in an inn. He makes no plans to return to the ship sooner than the following morning.

Alexis Smolensk said...

You see a number of half-orcs, and a great many more of the low Bulgar people, who are known to be less than 12% half-orc. These are peasant stock from Bulgar lands, whose ancestors settled south of the Danube nine centuries ago - those ancestors being mostly orc before culturally determining to mix their blood with as much human as possible, creating the present-day people.

You meet a half-orc who happens to mention a Cumanese Quarter of the city, that can be found in the Pera, near Dolma Baghtcheh, across the Golden Horn ... that expanse of water that separates old Constantinople from new Istanbul. (See added Map)

Andrej said...

Andrej seeks out the Pera to take his evening meal and find quarters for the night. He hopes for a warm mug of kumis, some marinated goat and perhaps curds boiled in sour milk and sugar. Something akin to this being played softly in a smoke-filled tearoom, would be nice:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hg3_BzwWNDU

Andrej said...

or maybe this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_QpkcqjZD0

Andrej said...

or, here's a nice mix:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFZDufUOadg&list=RD037_QpkcqjZD0

Alexis Smolensk said...

Beautiful, isn't it? yes, I think the food and tea room can be counted upon. The kumis would be the price of mead; goat may or may not be on the menu; the boiled curds would be equivalent to the price of bread.

Do you seek out a place specifically in the half-orc quarter, or just area of the Pera called Galata?

Andrej said...

Oh, definitely the half-or quarter. My trip is for more than just a longing for home... I hope for news from home and a contact or two here in Pera wouldn't be bad should I be able to manage it.

Andrej said...

In the Cumanese quarter may Andrej find and purchase a shalpan and aiyr kalpak, garb more befitting a Kazakh and presumably Cumanese gentleman? He would be looking for rich garmets, those that he could eventually use as a modified priestly vestment (say silk or some other rich fabric) which he will be augmented with his prayer shawl and beads for when he begins proselytizing in Cumana.

See images and descriptions below, particularly the pic of the man in the royal blue shalpan with the silver & tan embroidery:

http://www.bukhara-carpets.com/kazakh_traditional_costumes.html

Alexis Smolensk said...

We could go crazy trying to identify every local dress for every local region; the shalpan looks much more superfluous of cloth than the yalma ... so call it 50% more in cost. If you want it embroidered in the pic, I'll have to work out the price from scratch.

For the record, "Kazakhs" in my world are orcs, not humans, and therefore not player characters. Logically, then, Cumans would have some relation to their dress, but the rift would probably be quite wide.

I can give you the price of a silk vestment if you wish, or velvet; in silk it would be 112 g.p., weighing 23.8 oz.; in velvet, the same weight as wool, 4.8 lbs.



Andrej said...

Agreed on driving you nuts detailing every bit of local dress. ;)

Cost of velvet for above? And embroidery for both when you can. Thanks.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Not sure what you mean "for both" ... both what? I'm guessing you mean:

Shalpan, velvet, embroidered: 194 g.p., 6.3 lbs.

Shalpan, silk, embroidered: 260 g.p., 31.3 oz.

Andrej said...

You got it. Thanks Alexis.

I'll decide which of the above I want to purchase and update Andrej's character sheet accordingly. For now I suppose he's either within or still seeking out the Cumanese quarter in Pera/ Galata.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Take it that you are spending the night there. That puts you about eight to ten hours ahead of the other party. But their slow time is about to end.

Keep in mind, one of those two choices is a lot warmer in the winter, and one is a lot cooler in the summer.

Andrej said...

I bought 'em both. Andrej sold off one of his garnets and bought as follows:

a pocket telescope
a 10 oz. bottle of whiskey
a trained adult monkey
a silver holy symbol
a quality camelhair shalpan (+50% cost of yalma)
a blue aiyr kalpak (fez +50%)
Shalpan, velvet, embroidered
Shalpan, silk, embroidered
1 healing salve

Do I get to name the monkey or does he already have a name, being trained?

Alexis Smolensk said...

Now, how could I insist you call the monkey by a name I choose.

Easiest thing ... by the most AMAZING coincidence the name in your head just happens to be what the monkey was called by its trainer.

James C. said...

:)

Andrej said...

I had seriously considered naming the monkey Boehner, reasoning that perhaps the trainer was of German heritage and maybe the monkey an ancestor of a contemporary American politician... but then I'd be tempted to throw the poor thing over the side of ship whilst underway.

So, the monkey's name will be Farooq instead.

Andrej said...

Andrej continues to make purchases but I'll spare the details unless I buy something else of interest. My character sheet will be updated with the particulars today. Come, Farooq, we have much shopping to do.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Hah hah, Boehner. Sorry, that would have to be an orangatan with considerable orange patches.

I'm going to produce a post after an hour or so this morning that combines the party again. Until then, you asked about events in Cumana, and I've left that until now.

Cumana is one of three buffer states between Russia-Poland and the Ottoman Empire: Cumana, Zaporozhia and the Don Cossacks. Zaporozhia is like something out of a Conan novel; the people are human and extremely nomadic. Although there are "cities" in that territory, these are almost wholly tent cities with a continuously changing population, as clans come in, rest or trade for a few months, only to move outwards again to be replaced by other clans. So there's always a collection of persons and tents there, but the actual persons changes seasonally. There are almost NO permanent structures, not even a palace - the only ones would be scattered churches, mostly of foreigners. The Zaporozhians are principally animistic. They also tend to be 'mad' by European standards. They're violent, prone to clan in-fighting and revenge loops, extremely traditional in outlook and proud. Families are large and xenophobic in the extreme. Marriage outside the clan is done for political reasons, and then very rarely.

Alexis Smolensk said...

The Don Cossacks tend to be mercenary in habit. There are only villages in the Don lands and these are almost wholly inhabited by women and children. The men do not live with the women 9 to 10 months of the year, preferring to raid in every direction. Rangers are highly prevalent among the population and the Cossacks are extraordinary raiders and horseriders. They attack and disappear, attack and disappear, and since they have no 'base' of operations, the entire land could be put under military law and STILL they would function unchanged. The main difference would be that they would descend upon someone else's village and rape those women, as opposed to returning home once or twice a year to rape their wives.

Thus, everyone pays them off, and tries to pay a little bit more than their enemies. The Russians encourage them to attack the Ottomans or the orcs of Digoria, the Ottomans encourage them to attack the orcs of the Jagatai Empire, the Digorians encourage them to attack the Astrakhan Pirates, who encourage them to attack the Cumans and so on. The Don lands consist of dry, very poor soil, cold and windy much of the year and generally of no economic interest to anyone.

Alexis Smolensk said...

These two states, then, with Cumana, form a buffer between Russia, the Jagatai Empire (that reaches all the way to the modern Chinese border) and the Ottoman Empire. Together, they are a formidable power; all three recognize that the fall of any one of them guarantees the fall of all three. None are the kind that will bargain with their enemies, therefore ... and they often break treaties. They survive on account of two reasons:

1) The Ottoman Empire is huge, and the Turk army has many, many enemies. They can't afford to move a significant army into the area to destroy any of these three states because they must keep that army elsewhere, to defend lands that are far more valuable than the steppe occupied by Zaporozhia, Cumana and the Don Cossacks.

2) Russia and Poland are ALWAYS fighting. If they could settle their differences, then Russia might have the will and the power to move and consolidate its southern border. After all, its being raided by three peoples and keeping them all under treaty at the same time is impossible. But any sign of weakness by Russia on the Polish border and Poland rushes to take advantage. There are intricacies there, but I'll save on the writing.

Poland and Russia made peace about three years ago ... but both are in an 'arms race,' and the war could start again at any moment. Russia would like to seize Polissya and Smolensk; Poland would like to seize Bryansk and Kursk. And so it goes.

Helpful?

Andrej said...

Yup. Very. I imagine a future henchperson of a ranger persuasion, being I suppose either a cossack or zaporozhian. short bow, scimitar, fast horse... but that's some time away...

On a smaller scale and more near-term, you mentioned before that Andrej's home region of Itossia was flat prairie and about 8 hexes of territory, close upon a river that went to the Sea of Azov. Does his former hetman, Roggto, rule Itossia or is he only one among many hetmen that preside over the population of 27,000? Does he dwell in the tent-city of Itoskhan (modern Melitopol)? That is where Andrej's family is said to reside, at least that's how it was when he left. His aim would be to return to Itoskhan and begin preaching there. I believe those folk are split mostly between animism and some eastern orthodox, if I recall correctly. You had mentioned way, way back that Andrej's family converted to Catholicism out of respect for his choices... are or were there other Catholics in Itoskhan?

I retconned Andrej's birth name from Vitaly to Nergui to account for a more mongol and less Slavic influence.

Andrej said...

Never mind the question about whether Roggto presides over all of Itoskhan... I see the Yetabishi are one of seven tribes form the Cumanese culture post. Who are the other six or, perhaps more to the point, how do they get along and where is Roggto in terms of relative power? The question regarding Catholicism stands though.

Alexis Smolensk said...

There are few Catholics in Itoskhan or Cumana, perhaps 2% of the population; about 3% are Russian Orthodox, 5% are Greek Orthodox, 7% are Moslem. 1% would be Jewish. The remaining 78% of the population is a mixture of paganism (polytheistic Uighur/Mongol gods), Arianism (Gnostics) and animism (mysticism). Numbers for these are not available ... the majority is really a mix of all three.

There's an interesting Wikipedia entry, Codex Cumanicus that you might find most interesting.

Hm, six other tribes. De-Russifying the names typically given, I'll invent six other tribes with the next comment.


Andrej said...

Awesome link and thank you for the depth and breadth of the game.

Alexis Smolensk said...

The Zolozi are the wealthy, powerful tribe who dominate the huge city of Mutrakan. Remember that while the Zaporozhians live in tent cities, the Cumans do not; they are the most civilized of the three kingdoms above, and it is the Zolozi 'Fatherhood' that has chosen to embrace trade and civilization in a distinctly oriental manner that has produced Cumana. There are hundreds and hundreds of shrines in Mutrakan (a city of more than 50,000 people), where people are very religious, but these shrines do not depend upon the 'priest class' that exists in Western/Aryan culture. Like Buddhist Lamas, the most devout people are those who dedicate their lives to the acknowledgement of the gods, but they do not 'lead' others; religion is a daily, common experience, where each individual gives what respect they wish without the manufacture of western guilt.

The Zolozi are the most religious, educated, worldly tribe, who produce the kings of Cumana, but this tribe also treats all others within the Kingdom like a father to a his sons - disciplining as necessary, maintaining order, but also providing food and support in times of trouble. Many a time in Andrej's youth would there arrive, in a year of drought (and there are many such years in this country) a caravan full of food given by the Zolozi that kept the villages alive for the season.

Alexis Smolensk said...

The Dworka tribe are half-orc dwarves, whose pure-blood dwarf forefathers occupied lands along the edges of Altslok and Croft (in eastern Kazakhstan), and who migrated with the Cumans in the 11th century, who over a period of seven generations (the number is traditional) were given orc brides as tribute in exchange for weapons and armor that the dwarves provided. These orc brides were chosen by the dwarves, who it is said 'smoothed them of features unbecoming to the Dwarf eye' by magic. Now the Dworka, or Dworkin as they are sometimes called, occupy the hill country along the Donets River in the Donbass, where they keep to themselves, continue to mine and manufacture, and protect Cumana from the Don Cossacks and the Eastern steppes.

Andrej said...

love this stuff. :)

Alexis Smolensk said...

The Bonyaki tribe are farmers who dwell upon the river banks south of Mutrakan, who have very little imagination or interest in the world. They are "the back upon which the weight is borne," so is the traditional pride of that people. They are resentful of interlopers "who dare to treat the land as only dirt for their tramping feet"... but can be generous to travellers who are respectful of their ways. In general they are quite poor, suffering more than most from periods of drought, but nevertheless forming the strongest piller in the strength of the kingdom, both in physical manpower and food production.

Alexis Smolensk said...

The Torkastra occupy the lands nearest the Sea of Azov and the valley of the Don where it debouches into the sea. They are fishermen and teamsters, as well as smugglers who operate between Cumana and the Ottoman Empire. On the whole, they are not highly respected in Cumana, but are nevertheless closely protected by the Zolozi, who of course have great use for a people with less 'character' than the Bonyaki. The Bonyaki and Torkastra are the most likely tribes to have differences, which is in no small way affected by the passage of Torkastrans through Bonyaki lands on their way to Mutrakan, they're habit of treating all Bonyaki as 'mud-snuffling pigs' and so on.

The Torkastrans possess the largest number of Moslems, having interbred more with the Turks than any other tribe in the Kingdom, so that some Torkastrans are less than 10% Cuman (orc). It should be remember that the Cuman tribe were originally ALL orcs, but five centuries of dwelling in the midst of human peoples has largely reduced the pure orc blood, thus producing the half-orc kingdom. The Bonyaki are the purest strain; the Torkastra the most human.

Alexis Smolensk said...

The Gurdut live mostly in two groups, within the centers of Mutrakan and in Itoskhan. They do not have 'lands' of their own, though there are small hamlets of no name that are scattered throughout northern Cumana and Zaporozhian lands. The Gurdut are servants, mostly, who perform the lowest labor and who have the least amount of prestige in the kingdom. Gurdut children are often gathered at six-year intervals (paid as tribute by Gurdut families) and either sold abroad or occasionally made into eunichs for the Court. This is not seen as unusual, and indeed the Gurdut consider themselves to be highly blessed if the king should desire one of their children for this honor. It is said that the Gurdut "give in this world to receive in the cherished lands" ... which is a mystic belief in an Asian version of the 'happy hunting ground' that all Mongols dream of. The more a Gurdut gives in this life, the more it is said a Gurdut gains in the life hereafter - and giving a child offers great promise.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Finally, the Sharukan, who dwell in the city of Sumi, a tiny enclave joined to Cumana in the furthest north. The Sharukan are a small, very close tribe, who are scholars, interpreters, diplomats and teachers. In many ways they are the least religious, but the most talented of magicians in the kingdom. They see the kingdom as "Seven sticks that make a club," and are variously given to motivate the king to use the club in the wisest manner possible.

Despite their apparent superiority, the Sharukan behave in the most humble manner possible. They believe themselves to be the "least valuable of the tribes," are modest in dress and appearance, are generous, are more likely to seek peace of any of the tribes (including the Zolozi) and believe that retribution "Is the flood that destroys land and people alike." It is said that a Sharukan will never speak first when seated at a table ... and there is a myth that says of one Sharukan chief, Syrchan by name, "Waited so patiently for all his ministers to speak of all that required attention, that he did not speak for three nights and three days, and that on the fourth day when his opinion was at last sought, it was discovered that he had died."

Alexis Smolensk said...

(OOC: All right. All of that was made up on the spot, using my knowledge of the geography of Cumana; the only previous group that I knew of was the Dworkin, whom I've referred to in the past, but none of the detail about them existed until this moment).

Alexis Smolensk said...

Apparently, the same universe wiki is down again. Do you know where I've written about the Yetabishi, Andrej? Can you share whatever I happened to say about them?

Andrej said...

Wonderful. I love it all.

You only mentioned the yetabashi once by name, but based on the above I imagine they alone inhabit Itossia, seperate from the main of Cuman on the map, perhaps resulting in my tribal Roggto's Christianity. Below you can find all that I know you to have said... I look forward to their treatment.

http://taoscampaign.blogspot.com/2013/02/cumanese-culture.html

Andrej said...

Yetabeshi, that is.

Lukas said...

Huh, I almost bought a monkey myself. Then decided against it.

Andrej said...

I felt similarly about the hippogriff. :)

Andrej said...

Alexis, given the description of the Sharukan above, should we expect to see half-orc magic users or bards at some point or would these Cumani be human for game purposes?

Alexis Smolensk said...

Low orc heritage. Human for game purposes.

Lukas said...

After this I think I'm just looking at tourist purchases...

Andrej said...

Do we have hay for the horses? I have to admit I've been pretty lax on the hay and the grain since somewhere between Fiume and Koufunisia.

Alexis Smolensk said...

(OOC: Just now I'm fairly pissed. I'll take it up tomorrow)

Andrej said...

(OOC: I'm sorry that you have to put up with that shit. Taking a broader and more objective view than I could were I in your shoes, I see that were you of no consequence you wouldn't get such attention.

Alexis Smolensk said...

(OOC: Oh, my shoes are comfortable enough for that thought to have occurred to me)

Alexis Smolensk said...

The next post is up.