Friday, July 26, 2013

Fighting the Euroclydon

Feb 5, 1651, Friday evening

Weather: with overcast skies and brisk temperatures, and a gentle breeze, with a prevailing wind.
 
You come aboard, bringing your horses with you and making yourselves ready for the continuation of the journey.  The horses are soon full-sized and eating again - the crew has collected a hundred pounds of grain for them, to be sure they're well supplied.
 
The Bo'sun in still in command, and remains so two days later.  There's no word of the Captain emerging from her cabin, and the word goes around that she has not eaten during that time.  The morale of the crew is generally low, though it is not because they dislike the bo'sun.  They seem to accept completely that he is in authority, even though he would not be the next in the chain of command - that would be the mates, or officers.  Still, the mates obey him, they call him 'Skipper' and he treats them well ... with kid gloves, even, as he seems to know they're all worried about the Captain and where her mood might take her.  (I could not find a name for him ... let's say he's Danish, and call him Viggo.
 
The prevailing wind is the Euroclydon, that blows hard from the northeast and curls dangerously around the southern capes of the Peloponnese this time of year.  Viggo chooses ultimately not to risk the ship on the shore, and pursues a frustrated, difficult easterly course, worried of a change in the weather; he has heard that a warm crosswind from the south can gain a great deal of moisture off the Mediterranean and rain enough to swamp a boat in Winter.  He wants  no part of that.

The weather does turn gentle come Friday, and the boat makes good passage in a generally southeast direction, keeping the wind on her beam.
 
The exact placement of the ship is unknown to me just at the moment; I'll be working it out, and wanting to add a prevailing/secondary wind element to the weather generator.  It's safe to say you're probably three to four hexes east of Zakynthos at this time, in waters that are variably the Mediterranean and the Sea of Crete.



From Moby Dick:
 
"It stood on a sharp bleak corner, where that tempestuous wind Euroclydon kept up a worse howling than ever it did about poor Paul's tossed craft. Euroclydon, nevertheless, is a mighty pleasant zephyr to any one in-doors, with his feet on the hob quietly toasting for bed. "In of that tempestuous wind called Euroclydon," says an old writer- of whose works I possess the only copy extant- "it maketh a marvellous difference, whether thou lookest out at it from a glass window where the frost is all on the outside, or whether thou observest it from that sashless window, where the frost is on both sides, and of which the wight Death is the only glazier." True enough, thought I, as this passage occurred to my mind- old black-letter, thou reasonest well. Yes, these eyes are windows, and this body of mine is the house. What a pity they didn't stop up the chinks and the crannies though, and thrust in a little lint here and there. But it's too late to make any improvements now. The universe is finished; the copestone is on, and the chips were carted off a million years ago. Poor Lazarus there, chattering his teeth against the curbstone for his pillow, and shaking off his tatters with his shiverings, he might plug up both ears with rags, and put a corn-cob into his mouth, and yet that would not keep out the tempestuous Euroclydon."


UPDATE

Current reading stats:

 

44 comments:

Alexis Smolensk said...

I added a bit more detail about the wind, the date, and I'm working on a map picture now.

Andrej said...

Arrgh!

I suppose Andrej and Sofia return to their shipboard routines. Andrej to his studies with Lukas and Sofia to her studies with the glaive.

Alexis Smolensk said...

The image of the distance travelled is up now.

Alexis Smolensk said...

I meant to add that I have to get a grip on your studies, Andrej; try to find the document where I was recording them. Would you be able to tell me how many weeks we're shy of calculating out improvement on your ability to read?

Andrej said...

I would not at present, but will begin looking back through posts while the game proceeds. If my recollection is an accurate one, though, Andrej had mastered the basics of reading and writing and was working on more advanced studies at your last mention... perhaps upon leaving Lazaro's mountain hold?

Lukas said...

There has definitely been teaching at least mentioned while on the ship. I distinctly remember having to come up with an excuse as Ahmet thought reading was useless...

Maximillian said...

Am I to understand that the ship left port before the provisions we purchased in zante were able to be loaded onto the boat?

It looks like we've spent two more days resting aboard the ship. I'll cast CLW twice:
d4+4: 6
d4+4: 5
Do I also gain 1 hp per day?
Lukas, If you have a polish spell available, It'd be great if you could polish up my plate mail.

Maximillian said...

reading: http://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=1937573272180849727&postID=7121058271426075902&isPopup=true

Lukas said...

I know this sounds terrible, but after 2 days I would have polished my stuff first. That said, you can be first to have your item polished.

If we want to queue up I'll rotate by item between you guys.

Also, each night I will be sleeping on a conjured bed wedged between cargo so it doesn't move anywhere...

Lukas said...

That said...

Alexis, I have cast polish on the scale mail and the great helm.

Maximillian said...

Andrej, would you like to renew the group fund? If you don't want the extra effort, that's fine.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Oh, I know there has been reading and effort aboard ship, and I do remember that Andrej has the basics of reading managed.

Somewhere, I think, I posted an image of the reading that had been done in the bandit camp, but I'm lazy and I haven't gone looking for it yet.

Lukas, please roll a d3 x10% for each item you polish.

Yes, you heal 1 hit point a day onboard ship.

Alexis Smolensk said...

I did find it; the Christmas Eve post.

It's been five weeks since then - I'll update and post it.

Andrej said...

On the first full day aboard ship Andrej casts cure light wounds on Ahmet and heals a max of 8 hp. Perhaps he also clucks his tongue at Ahmet when he is forced to spend the much more effective aid spell upon himself, and restores 14 of his own hit points.

Lukas said...

30% and 20% respectively.

Andrej said...

On Feb 5th, Andrej repeats the process from the day before, reciting a homily relaying the dangers of delaying the lord's gift unnecessarily to Ahmet before deigning to heal him 7 hit points.

Andrej makes some show of healing himself 16 hit points, being more than enough to restore him to maximum.

Andrej said...

I trust all other party members are now at or close to maximum? Ahmet, how far off are you?

Maximillian said...

Once things have settled down a bit, I will call Mareo down to the hold where the horses are, and where I have counted out 35 gold, and 64 silver into the great helmet.

I tell him that the coin is the back wages that I owed him (less the money I'd loaned him in Bozen, for the accountants out there) The helmet, as well as the two suits of armor and another 50 gold that I am holding onto for him, are his share of the plunder from the Great Beast BOROGE He can choose between his three sets of armor, and sell the rest when we get back to port. (I'll let him know that Lukas may be able to help him improve the armor, if he asks nicely.)

Alexis Smolensk said...

Someone else was also learning to read?

Ahmet said...

Enrico was learning to read.

Ahmet was at 8 HP out of 53; the two CLWs put him up to 23. If we've had three full days of rest, he's up to 29 HP (Ahmet heals 2 HP per day).

Enrico is at 3 out of 17, or now 6 out of 17 with 3 days of rest.

Does polish do anything truly supernatural, or is it merely a good polishing -- i.e. can Enrico, Tazio, and Carlito duplicate its effects with a little elbow grease?

Alexis Smolensk said...

Mareo will hold back from asking Lukas. He will gratefully make use of the helmet, sock away the coin and pick out a suit of scale mail.

Andrej said...

Enrico will have the benefit of the next available aid spell, being a good Catholic boy, I believe.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Let's call Enrico at 12 weeks worth of learning; Andrej has 38. I have it saved now in a document - do you need me to post the results?

Andrej said...

I'd like to see the results. :)

Alexis Smolensk said...

Enrico has never been baptized.

Maximillian said...

I will also return the 50 gold that Sophia lent me with my gratitude. Andrej, let me know you see this please.

Alexis Smolensk said...

New reading stats are up.

Andrej said...

I see it Max. Thank you.

Andrej said...

It's nice to see Andrej make some headway on his spelling, though declensions still continue to give him quite a bit of trouble.

Andrej said...

Alexis, are there engravings/ decorations of any kind upon Sofia's gold medallion? If so, and if you have no care as to their nature, may I take the liberty of describing them?

Alexis Smolensk said...

(never have anything engraved)

This is fun. Let's go with this:

http://www.ancientresource.com/images/medieval_crusades/knights-templar/philippe-IV-medal-1314-2a.jpg

Andrej said...

Sweet. I'll take it.

Alexis Smolensk said...

(OOC: okay, fellas, I'm going to go out shopping this afternoon, hang out, do some laundry, relax. I'll pick up the game Monday, though only briefly because I'll walk into a lot of work that's been piling up this week. Take care, hope you're good with the progress)

Andrej said...

I'm good. Enjoy the weekend all.

Ahmet said...

Just as an aside, why not get something engraved? Because you can't return it?

Alexis Smolensk said...

(OOC: I only meant that, if you give something engraved, sooner or later someone is going to ask you what the engraving is ...)

Ahmet said...

Oh! Speaking of which, what's on Ahmet's engraved great helmet?

Andrej said...

lol!

Ahmet said...

If you're looking for a suggestion, how about this one -- a Venetian officer's helmet from the Siege of Famagusta on Cyprus in 1571.

Alexis Smolensk said...

Sure, that's fine. Consider it in somewhat better condition, however, than the image.

(OOC: As promised, busy catching up on email at work - 325 total - and am going to be hooped most of the day; I'll try to get up another post before the end of the day)

Lukas said...

(OOC: always the best welcome back from vacation, knowing that your workplace needs you... And wants you to do twice as much work for as long as your vacation was.)

Alexis Smolensk said...

(OOC: Sorry ... I will get up another post, but better count on it being around the end of the day)

Andrej said...

(OOC: No worries. Completely understand, the first day back)

Alexis Smolensk said...

The next post is finally up.