Monday, January 21, 2013

Chioggia by the Sea





Dec 29, 1650, Monday evening
Weather: with cool temperatures and sunny conditions, with a strong breeze

The party runs into a bit of luck and finds their way unimpeded all the way to the sea.

The first day, December 26, Bozen is struck by a steady blizzard, with icy temperatures, that makes travel impossible ... but thankfully, the high wind blows the blizzard through and by early afternoon the sky clears, the weather calms and the party is able to take the road south as far as Trient.  The valley widens and widens along the course of the Adige River (which you follow from Bozen).  This is the High Plain, thin earth mixed with gravel, not very fertile, but there are goats and sheep in abundance.  The slopes have been denuded of trees, and are bare and cold looking.  The weather is frosty by mid-day and you're all quite cold by the time you reach Trient, another metropolis as large as Bozen.

The second day opens with some light snow, still icy temperatures, but these steadily climb above the freezing point during the day to where it is merely chilly by the time you reach Verona.  The road has slowed you up some, as it is icy itself and you're reduced to walking your horses most of the day.  Lukas's magical mount could manage it just fine, but he would leave you behind in the dust.  As you approach Verona, you find yourselves upon the Lower Plain, where it is profoundly fertile.  The empty posts for wine grapes spread as far as you can see, and there are many little houses.  The farms appear to be as small as 10 acres on the average.  By nightfall, you're glad to be inside, as an intermittent drizzle settles down to make the roads covered with ice again.

Verona is immense, with more than 10,000 buildings, three times the size of Trient, and sprawling - it seems - to the horizon.  It is hard to imagine that a city could be so big, especially since you've just passed through two other cities nearby that seemed large enough to occupy all the land you've seen.  You begin to get a sense of just how fertile is northern Italy.

Despte expectations, as you awake on the third day, you find the sky is clear, the temperature has risen above the freezing point (it is chilly), and the wind is calm.  You make good time upon a road wide enough for 16 horses to walk abreast.  The weather is brisk and your spirits are high as you travel.

You meet many people through the day, hauling hay, building stone, cartloads of gravel, driving beasts of every description and so on.  Most are friendly, in a manner that makes some of you nervous, but they seem to mean no harm.  Germany is nothing like this tremendously flat land, with its plaster buildings, its lush grass (three feet tall in large patches and brown with the season) and its people dressed in loose fitting shirts wrapped around the waist.  Most are not even carrying weapons, and even those you see on horseback wear no armor.  You pass through Vicenza - at 1,500 buildings a comparably small town - and continue to Padua.  This again is as large as Verona was ... you cannot help be astounded by all the people.

Maximillian remarks on the existence of the Orto Botanico of Padua, founded in 1545, and that it must be something amazing.  He would like to be shown in to it, but he doubts the likelihood of that, and at any rate the rest of the party would likely shut him down.  After all, at least until you reach Fiume, the party is on a schedule.

It is frosty in the morning as you leave Padua on the 29th.  By late afternoon the weather is positively cool ... and all day you can clearly smell the sea.  By evening you reach the island of Chioggia, and the small city thereupon.  There are more docks and warehouses than buildings of residence, and evidence of huge hydraulic projects that have been initiated upon the Lagoon of Venice here.  The city of Venice is to the north, but it is past the horizon, about seven miles away.

Throughout your travels you have crossed 2 major borders (into the Prince-Bishopric of Trient and into the Republic of Venice) and four minor tolls, into the territories Verona, Vicenza, Padua, Venice (that controls some of the mainland) and Chioggia.  The total fees would be 11 s.p. per horse and 40 s.p. per person.

To enter the city of Chioggia, where you will need to be in order to obtain a barge to Venice, will cost you 1 g.p. per horse or person.

35 comments:

Maximillian said...

I have a writ of Passage (I assume just for Tyroll, and it looks like all those borders were in Trient or venice) Would that save me any of those tolls?

While I too would love to see the gardens in Padua, I will save that for another time.

Alexis said...

It saves Maximillian only for territories within the Kingdom of the Hapsburgs ... specifically, Banovina, Breisachgau, Brixen, Carinthia, Constance, Gorz, Kordun, Lower Austria, Lower Carniola, Lower Styria, Piombino, South Tyrol, Stockach, Styria, Trieste, Tyrol, Uberlingen, Upper Austria and Upper Carniola, inclusive. These are scattered all over modern Germany, Austria, Italy and old Yugoslavia ... so we'll both have to be vigilant.

Maximillian said...

Ok, my purse is updated.

Shall we camp one more night before catching the ferry to Chiogga and then Venice?

Maximillian said...

Oh, that's 40 s.p., not 40 c.p. I do not have enough to cover even the tolls to chiogga, let alone my fare for the ferry. (I guess I should not have had Mareo buy that horse...) that horse...
I'm sorry friends, but I must beg the loan of 18 copper pieces for the road tolls, and throw myself on your mercy for fares and lodging going forward.

Mareo can attempt to sell his hose, but though he owes me 415 copper pieces for his equipment, I have not paid him his wages while we were trapped in the mountain, and I would have to persuade him to loan me any proceeds. At least it would save the horse's fare.

Ahmet said...

Carlito also has a writ of passage:

"Distinguished effort has secured a writ of passage (free from tolls) throughout the realm."

Presumably this applies within the Kingdom of Naples, so I'm not sure if it works here.

Alexis said...

Carlito's passage does apply within the Kingdom of Naples.

Andrej said...

Sofia gives Maximilian 50 gold pieces. "For the road, my friend."

I say we secure ferry/ barge passage to Venice post-haste.



Ahmet said...

Does that mean Carlito doesn't have to pay, or none of us have to pay, or some portion of us don't have to pay... or we all have to pay because we're not in the Kingdom of Naples? :)

Alexis said...

The writ of passage applies only to the holder.

Ahmet said...

Gotcha.

Assuming Carlito has a free ride all the way, Ahmet pays the tolls for himself, Enrico, Tazio, his two horses, and Enrico's horse, totaling 18 g.p. and 1 s.p.

Alexis said...

Um, Carlito's writ is for the Kingdom of Naples. You are not in the Kingdom of Naples.

Carlito Must Pay.

Ahmet said...

Ah.

OK, Ahmet pays for Carlito too, making it 21 g.p. and 9 s.p.

Lukas said...

Lukas does NOT have his magical mount for any tolls for sure...

Since we have enough horses.
Tolls paid.

Alexis said...

(OOC: It's an interesting point. I'm not sure if you'd have to pay for a magical mount. It's a tariff, after all ... its not as though you're importing something substantial.

Should there be a toll on importing mages?)

Andrej said...

Andrej and Sofia have paid for themselves and their four horses.

Maximillian said...

(heh; there already is, it's just the same as the "tariff" on importing fighters or peasants)

Alexis said...

When people say "tolls paid" do they mean thus far, or do they include the cost to get onto Chioggia?

Maximillian said...

I did not yet pay the ferryman, or add Sofia's gift to my inventory.

Thank you profusely, Sofia.

My vote is still to pass through the town in the morning, but I'll again defer the decision making to those who have business here.

Lukas said...

I'm ready to go in. I have paid to enter.

The thing is, is it obvious it's a magical mount? If it's not, then yeah I can hear that excuse come up a lot...

I have not seen a cost for water travel yet.

Ahmet said...

I paid the silvers for the major borders/minor tolls and the gold for Chioggia.

Andrej said...

I'm paid up to and in to Chioggia.

Hey Maximillian, why wait to pass into the town in the morning?

Sofia says you're welcome.

Alexis said...

Until actually entering Chioggia, you wouldn't be able to converse with those people making the trip to Venice.

Maximillian said...

Sorry about the delay, I have now paid the 3 gold for the ferry.

I guess I was mostly concerned about money.

Alexis said...

Money will come from somewhere.

I have little to say about the city of Chioggia, except that it is very busy. It is the off-season, however, and there are private rooms available for the night, for 5 s.p. Common rooms for 10 c.p. You learn that the barge to Venice will cost you 21 s.p. per person or animal.

Italy is an expensive place.

Alexis said...

(OOC: I have to call it for the day. Tomorrow, Venice and your rent!)

Maximillian said...

Mareo and Maximillian sleep in the common room. How much for stabling?

Andrej said...

Private rooms for Andrej and Sofia (10 silvers) plus whatever the stabling costs.

Once the party is ready in the morning, Andrej and Sofia will also pay for the ferry for themselves and their 4 horses: 84 silvers

Ahmet said...

Assuming we can double up, Ahmet and Enrico share one room while Tazio and Carlito take the other (10 s.p.), plus whatever the stabling cost for three horses.

Ahmet pays the ferry costs for himself, Enrico, Tazio, Carlito, and their three horses: 126 s.p.

Alexis said...

Stabling: 11 c.p. for a riding or light war horse, 15 c.p. for a medium, 19 c.p. for a heavy (all these with feed included).

Alexis said...

We're ready to go to Venice?

Andrej said...

Yes, on to VENICE!

http://youtu.be/aqQoXaD8kgQ?t=2m10s

Maximillian said...

yes, onward. Barge fare paid.

Lukas said...

I have paid barge and overnight fees.
I am ready to proceed.

(OOC: As a side note, while my character has avoided pneumonia, apparently I am not so lucky. One of these days I may be posting late due to finally being able to sleep more than four hours. Just a heads up.)

Ahmet said...

Anchors aweigh!

Alexis said...

The next post is up.